Past Exhibitions

Rural Occupations: Images of Work in Edo-Period Art

ended on November 28th, 2021

Lively and engaging images of urban and rural workers populate the works of art created during the Edo and Meiji periods on view in this exhibition. In idealized scenes created to confirm governmental authority and societal stability, as well as in closely observed records of individuals undertaking specific tasks, the lives and labors of workers in pre-modern Japan are the focus of the artists’ attention. Read More

A person stands in the museum Great Hall listening to an audio installation

Marta Rodriguez Maleck: Morir es Vivir

ended on October 3rd, 2021

Morir es Vivir (To Die is to Live) is a sound and light installation that weaves together voices from across the New Orleans community. The audio collage, presented in NOMA’s Great Hall, is the result of a series of conversations in which New Orleans-based artist Marta Rodriguez Maleck held space for people who wanted to express their grief and loss, contemplate mortality and rebirth, and explore the potential for healing and hope. Read More

Mending the Sky

ended on January 31st, 2021

Mending the Sky brings together eleven artist projects that envision our world after disaster. The exhibition takes its title from a Chinese fable in which a rip in the sky causes the earth to split open, bringing floods, fires, famine, and disease—until a goddess takes on the arduous task of mending the broken sky. Read More

Roberto Lugo: “Stunting” Garniture Set

ended on April 11th, 2021

In 2019, the New Orleans Museum of Art commissioned Philadelphia-based artist Roberto Lugo to create “Stunting,” a set of three ceramic pots inspired by NOMA’s traditional collection. Best known for cultural mash-ups that blend contemporary social issues with traditional porcelain pottery, Lugo’s powerful commentary on poverty, inequality, and racial injustice has made him a defining artist for our moment. Read More

New Photography: Create, Collect, Compile

ended on June 6th, 2021

Over the past two decades, the ways in which we create, collect, and compile photographs have shifted dramatically. In broad strokes, we might define this shift as away from photographs as singular, iconic, and private objects to a ubiquitous, public, and collective phenomenon that is now often immaterial. This exhibition presents the work of four photographers, all of whom work with, and critique, these new practices in photography. Unified by their understanding of the photograph as an ambiguous messenger, each of these artists creates, collects, or compiles photographs to trace narratives about identity, community, and power. Read More

Alia Ali: FLUX

ended on November 15th, 2020

Yemeni-Bosnian artist Alia Ali explores cultures at geographic crossroads. Her work considers how politics, economics and histories collide in fabric patterns and techniques, showing how fabric both unites and divides us. Focusing on wax print fabric—a form with roots in Indian, Japanese, Chinese, Javanese, Dutch and African traditions—FLUX captures the way textiles move and migrate across different cultures. Read More

Regina Agu: Passage

ended on February 9th, 2020

Passage is an immersive, site-specific installation created for the New Orleans Museum of Art by contemporary artist Regina Agu and marks her first solo museum show. Inspired by the historical form of the panorama, Agu’s 100-foot-long installation weaves together imagery of waterways from across Louisiana to consider how the landscapes, people, and histories of the region are connected by and through water. This installation was created in partnership with A Studio in the Woods, through an artist residency. Read More

Torkwase Dyson: Black Compositional Thought | 15 Paintings for the Plantationocene

ended on January 10th, 2021

Produced for the New Orleans Museum of Art, this new series of fifteen paintings by Torkwase Dyson are inspired by the design systems of architecture, water infrastructure, the oil and gas industry, and the physical impact of global warming. The exhibition also examines the legacy of plantation economies and their relationship to the environmental and infrastructural issues of our current age, which many characterize as the “plantationocene.” Read More

Orientalism: Taking and Making

ended on January 2nd, 2022

Drawn from NOMA’s permanent collection, this installation addresses shades of oppression, racism, and superficial cultural understanding layered in 19th-century Orientalist paintings, photographs, and decorative arts. Read More

An Ideal Unity: The Bauhaus & Beyond

ended on March 15th, 2020

This selection of works from NOMA’s permanent collection will celebrate the centennial of the founding of the Bauhaus, the world-renowned school in Weimar-era Germany that endeavored to unify art, architecture, craft, and design. Including diverse media by Bauhaus teachers and students, this exhibition will show the breadth of the Bauhaus’ influence and its role as one of the most pivotal movements in modern design. Read More

Tina Freeman: Lamentations

ended on October 11th, 2020

Over the past seven years, Tina Freeman has photographed the wetlands of Louisiana and the glacial landscapes of the Arctic and Antarctica. In Lamentations, Freeman pairs images from these disparate regions in a series of diptychs that function as stories about climate change, ecological balance, and the connectedness of disparate landscapes across time and space. Read More

Inventing Acadia: Painting and Place in Louisiana

ended on January 26th, 2020

Inventing Acadia: Painting and Place in Louisiana is the first major exhibition featuring Louisiana landscape painting in more than forty years. Inventing Acadia reveals Louisiana’s role in creating—and exporting—a new vision for American landscape painting in the nineteenth century that was vastly different from that found in the rest of the United States. Read More

Buddha and Shiva, Lotus and Dragon: Masterworks from the Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection at Asia Society

ended on May 31st, 2021

Nearly seventy of the finest examples of Asian art in the United States, collected by John D. Rockeller 3rd and his wife Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller between the 1940s and ’70s, will be showcased in an exhibition on loan from the Asia Society Museum. The extraordinary range of bronzes, ceramics, and metalwork reveals great achievements in Asian art spanning more than two millennia. Read More

Bodies of Knowledge

ended on October 13th, 2019

Bodies of Knowledge brings together eleven international contemporary artists to reflect on the role that language plays in archiving and asserting our cultural identities. Working with materials that range from books and silent film to ink, ashes, and musical scores, these artists counter more staid and static ways of representing our collective pasts. Read More

Timothy Duffy: Blue Muse

ended on August 4th, 2019

Timothy Duffy creates one-of-a-kind direct positive tintype portraits of American musicians using an American photography process that goes back to the nineteenth-century. Despite the importance of these musicians and the national legacy they represent, they remain little known, often outpaced by other popular performers who have built their own careers on top of the “roots” of these musicians and their ancestors. Read More

Upcoming Exhibitions

Stela of Nakhi, “Servant in the Place of Truth”, Offering to Osiris and Anubis

Queen Nefertari’s Egypt

on view starting March 18th, 2022

Queen Nefertari, the royal wife of Pharaoh Ramesses II (reigned 1279–13 BCE), is linked to some of the most magnificent monuments of ancient Egypt. Appearing in sculpture and images, and identified in inscriptions on buildings associated with Ramesses II, she is also known through a complete temple consecrated to her in Abu Simbel, beside the one dedicated to her husband. Her tomb is the largest and most richly decorated in the Valley of the Queens. It was discovered in the early 20th century by a team of archaeologists led by Ernesto Schiaparelli, then director of the Museo Egizio in Turin. Read More

Katherine Choy: Radical Potter in 1950s New Orleans

on view starting May 6th, 2022

Katherine Choy (American, b. China 1927-1958) was one of the first ceramicists to bridge Asian traditions into Modern abstract art. Katherine Choy: A Radical Potter in 1950s New Orleans mines New Orleans archives and gathers oral histories in the first monographic review of an artist that was celebrated by the 1950s American craft world, but has nonetheless been nearly forgotten. NOMA’s exhibition will be the first presentation of Choy’s extraordinary ceramics in New Orleans since the artist’s Louisiana friends mounted the Katherine Choy Memorial Show at the Orleans Gallery in fall 1959. Read More

Louise Bourgeois: Paintings

on view starting September 9th, 2022

Louise Bourgeois: Paintings is the first comprehensive exhibition of paintings produced by the iconic French-American artist Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010) between her arrival in New York in 1938 and her turn to sculpture in the late 1940s. Read More

Black American Studio Photography

on view starting September 16th, 2022

From photography’s beginnings in the United States, Black studio photographers operated on the developing edge of photographic media to produce beautiful portraits for their clients, while also making a variety of other photographic work in keeping with important movements like pictorialism, modernism, and abstraction. Black American Studio Photography illustrates the artistic virtuosity, social significance, and political impact of African American photographers working in commercial portrait studios during photography’s first century. Read More


Current Exhibitions

Dawn DeDeaux: The Space Between Worlds

on view through January 23rd, 2022

Dawn DeDeaux: The Space Between Worlds is the first comprehensive museum exhibition for the pioneering multimedia artist Dawn DeDeaux. Since the 1970s, DeDeaux’s practice has spanned video, performance, photography, and installation to create art that exists at the edge of the Anthropocene. Anticipating a future imperiled by the runaway population growth, breakneck industrial development, and the looming threat of climate change, DeDeaux has long worked between worlds of the present and the future. Read More


Exhibition Videos